Category Archives: Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory

Pahl-wostl, A. C., Gupta, J., & Petry, D. (2008). Governance and the Global Water System : A Theoretical Exploration. Global Governance, 14(4), 419–435.

The focus of this article is global water governance, as the most recent approach to addressing water issues. Previous approaches, including local, national, and basin scales have not been replaced, but are now joined by a global scale to water … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reed, M. G., & Bruyneel, S. (2010). Rescaling environmental governance, rethinking the state: A three-dimensional review. Progress in Human Geography, 34(5), 646–653

This article provides a critical perspective on the notion of multi-level governance and the perceived ‘hollowing-out’ of the state. Though multi-level governance implies inclusion of a variety of actors at different scales, all engaged in management over a resources, or … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory, Theme 2: Transboundary Water Governance | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Walker, B., & Salt, D. (2012). Resilience Practices: Building Capacity to Absorb Disturbance and Maintain Function. Island Press.

A foundational, and easily accessible piece! This should have been ground zero for my first foray with resilience. Walker and Salt provide a concise and accessible overview of resilience theory, supported by numerous case studies from around the world. They … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Leave a comment

Martin-Breen, P., & Anderies, J. M. (2011). Resilience: A Literature Review.

Resilience of what, to what? And, resilience for whom? These are the key questions that must be asked before the notion of resilience theory and its application to complex adaptive systems makes any sense. Resilience can be good. It can allow for adaptation, innovation, … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Leave a comment

Green, O. et al. (2013). Resilience in Transboundary Water Governance : the Okavango River. Ecology and Society, 18(2).

This article uses the Okavango River Basin, and specifically OKACOM, to illustrate two fundamental issues for resilience in a transboundary watershed: 1) key components for adaptive governance that can foster resilient social-ecological systems, and, 2) treaty elements for institutional and … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory, Theme 2: Transboundary Water Governance | Leave a comment

Cosens, B., & Williams, M. (2012). Resilience and Water Governance : Adaptive Governance in the Columbia. Ecology and Society, 12(4).

Cosens (2012) looks at the issue of legitimacy in adaptive management implementation. Her case study on the Columbia River basin helps to show how adaptive management approaches can fail if legitimacy, in its various guises, can fail if not implemented … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Leave a comment

Rijke, J., Farrelly, M., Brown, R., & Zevenbergen, C. (2013). Configuring transformative governance to enhance resilient urban water systems. Environmental Science & Policy, 25, 62–72.

There were a few parts of this article that were especially relevant and useful (or at least insightful). Particularly, the way the authors used the adaptive cycle to show the different stages of where the water sensitive cities (WSC) of … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Leave a comment

Cash, D. W., Adger, W. N., Berkes, F., Garden, P., Lebel, L., & Olsson, P. (2006). Scale and Cross-Scale Dynamics : Governance and Information in a Multilevel World. Ecology and Society, 11(2).

A critical piece on scale and cross-scale dynamics. Addressing a multitude of important issues, such as innovations in social and environmental policy requires approaches that consider cross scale and cross level dynamics and relationships. As the challenges we see in … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Leave a comment

Pahl-Wostl, C. (2009). A conceptual framework for analysing adaptive capacity and multi-level learning processes in resource governance regimes. Global Environmental Change, 19(3), 354–365.

Pahl-Wostl begins the article with a very simple question:  how to implement sustainable resource governance and management regimes that are resilient to global and climate change? Two approaches she suggests is adaptive governance and social learning, which have been identified … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Andersson, K. P., & Ostrom, E. (2008). Analyzing decentralized resource regimes from a polycentric perspective. Policy Sciences, 41(1), 71–93

The 1990s saw a shift in approaches to natural resource management regimes. As Andersson and Ostrom show, the centralized approach to resource management of the preceeding decades began to shift in favour of a more decentralized, community-based approach to natural … Continue reading

Posted in Reading Reflections, Theme 1: Multilevel governance and resilience theory | Leave a comment